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  1. Home > running with the bulls

    Well in honor of one of the writers that I admired in college, we shall talk about the life of Ernest Hemmingway. We do this because of the publicity of the running with the bulls in Spain. Ernest and his book called “old man and the sea” published in 1951 was one of the books you did not...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/13/2014
  2. Home > runnig with the bulls

    Well in honor of one of the writers that I admired in college, we shall talk about the life of Ernest Hemmingway. We do this because of the publicity of the running with the bulls in Spain. Ernest and his book called “old man and the sea” published in 1951 was one of the books you did not...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/13/2014
  3. Home > the hungry lizard

    Okay I know some of you missed my blog yesterday because I did not make one. See I had so much ground to cover I felt like a . So trap yourself in and I will tell you how my day went down. Well about 8:30 we showed up at the Corona Farmers Market just to snoop around. I got my skin...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/13/2014
  4. Home > electric happenings

    Good day to you, glad you came by. We are here in the “circle city” of Corona, California where its 59 degrees and supposed to be just 30 more by the time the sun sets. Well I have to tell you that forecast might be a little off and you should add 5 degrees to it. But hey what is 5 degrees...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/11/2014
  5. Home > Importing water

    Well hello, glad you came by for a spell. That coffee pot over there is just fresh made coffee so help yourself to a cup. Take the chair over by the window, people say it’s comfortable. I see you are up early today also. Yes here in the circle city of Corona, California it’s going to be double...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/10/2014
  6. Home > Missed meeting

    Well it was made official; Riverside, California is another city to turn off its red light cameras. While I was having fun at the Corona Art Association meeting, the city council in Riverside, California was axing the cameras after 8 years. What is going to take the place of the $500.00 tickets ...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/9/2014
  7. Home > Brown is the color

    The color brown Well hello today we are going to explore the color brown. Yes that stuff you stand on when you leave the green grass. It is a composite color made by combining Red, yellow and some black. The color is seen widely in nature, in wood, soil, and human hair, eye color and...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/8/2014
  8. Home > Time for tuesday

    Well I am sure by now you all know of the recovery of the stolen Matisse painting called “Odalisque in Red Pants.” But don’t look for it in the United States, because it’s going to be in the Caracas museum. It was recovered in 2012 by F.B.I. agents in Miami when they arrested two people and...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/8/2014
  9. Home > Super sunday in the sun

    So hello to everyone out there in internet land. We are in the circle city of Corona, California this morning and are getting ready for temperatures in the 95 degree range. Can you get too much BBQ food in one week? Well the smell of BBQing is in the air these last few days. Now I like the ...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/6/2014
  10. Home > Roy Lichtenstein

    Roy Lichtenstein, October 27, 1923 – September 29, 1997 was a famous artist noted for his “pop art.” He became a leading figure in the movement along with others who have names like Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Linquest to name a few. Favoring the comic strip as his main...
    Author: mike@sensarium.com Created: 7/5/2014

running with the bulls 

Well in honor of one of the writers that I admired in college, we shall talk about the life of Ernest Hemmingway. We do this because of the publicity of the running with the bulls in Spain.

Ernest and his book called “old man and the sea” published in 1951 was one of the books you did not want to stop reading. Yes page after page was turned in almost a one setting while I was reading the book.

It is sad that such a talented writer would suffer from hemochromatosis much like his father before him. His sister Ursula and his brother Leicester also committed suicide along with his granddaughter. Almost exactly 35 years after Hemingway's death, on July 1, 1996, his granddaughter Margaux Hemingway died in Santa Monica, California. Margaux was a supermodel and actress, co-starring with her sister Mariel in the 1976 movie Lipstick. But her death was later ruled a suicide, making her "the fifth person in four generations of her family to commit suicide

But with the show opening up on Saturday for the Corona Art Association a lot still needs to be done. So while some of the bean counters were making a final tally of the income and expenses for the month, I was getting the pictures hung on the wall. Yes with some help from another artist called Oscar, we have all of the painting on the little wires and hanging straight.

This show called “oldies but goodies” has some really nice art. I was going to take some pictures today, but when I zoomed out of the house I forgot the camera until I got to the gallery.

Well I was snacking on the ice cold watermelon that I had in the refrigerator. Yes it is now about ½ the size with the help of some of the others there in the gallery today.

Posted by Puck Sunday, July 13, 2014 7:37:00 PM

the hungry lizard 

Okay I know some of you missed my blog yesterday because I did not make one. See I had so much ground to cover I felt like a . So trap yourself in and I will tell you how my day went down.

Well about 8:30 we showed up at the Corona Farmers Market just to snoop around. I got my skin lathered with some bees wax and vitamin e that is supposed to help my scars. A good handful of the sellers were flower merchants and we took some pictures of the flowers.

We passed on a loaf of the fresh bread that did smell good, but the kettle corn was not yet done so we did not get a bag of it. One guy did sell some really nice wood things like cutting boards and cribbage boards. Well just as we were getting ready to have a hot tamale, we noticed that it was time to leave.

So back in the truck and out on to Main street to open up the Corona Art Association gallery and see how many students were going to show up for the Mixed Media class. Of course you just can’t fall though the door and we had to drag out the supplies we were going to use today.

One of the first projects we did was some of the artist’s trading cards. I was using scrap mat board that would otherwise be thrown away. I showed the how to use the board as it was or put some other paper over the mat board.

Well one of my advanced students did about 9 of the little cards. I convinced him to leave 4 of them to be put on my Student Gallery section so they would be shared with others.

But while I was teaching the class, the members were also falling through the door to leave off the pictures for the new show. Yes it was a bit confusing to say the least.

So after having the time for the take in of the art work from 11:00 to 6:00 we still had some that just couldn’t make it on Saturday, but will show up on Sunday, which is today. I really need to write down some of these excuses, because I may need to also use them in the future.

So we have about 32 pictures to hang for the new show. Well I hung/hang most of the pictures anyway, but they want you to come back on Tuesday to hang the show. I like to do it today while I have to be there for 4 hours. If you can’t hang 30 or so pictures in 4 hours you are in bad shape.

So I know you are asking yourself, why are you going there today? Well it is the open gallery day where some of the members fall through the door and work on their art. Also I am going to work on some of the projects for my Mixed media class.

The students are going to make a journal like thing to keep their artwork in. Again I am using left over mat board to make the covers for the journals. They will be decorating them in the coming weeks. It will be a good place for them to keep all of the drawing they are making.

Well that’s all for today.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Puck Sunday, July 13, 2014 8:05:00 AM

electric happenings 

Good day to you, glad you came by. We are here in the “circle city” of Corona, California where its 59 degrees and supposed to be just 30 more by the time the sun sets. Well I have to tell you that forecast might be a little off and you should add 5 degrees to it. But hey what is 5 degrees among friends? But as I’m typing this the sun is still not up yet.

For those of you taking notes, we are having a “microwave breakfast.” Yes a bowl of oatmeal, pre cooked sausage and some left over coffee. All ready in less than 10 minutes. The oatmeal has some organic raisins in it with some cinnamon too.

One of the things that caught my eye recently was making some “artists trading cards.” Sometimes called ATC’s for short. They are just the same size as regular cards and you can paint them just like you would a big painting. Just think of them as a small canvas. You can use watercolor, oils, pencil, markers almost anything you want. Cards are produced in various media, including dry media (pencils, pens, markers, etc.), wet media (watercolor, acrylic paints, etc.), paper media (in the form of collage, paper cuts, found objects, etc.) or even metals or fiber. The cards are usually traded or exchanged. When sold, they are usually referred to as art card editions and originals (ACEOs).

Letterbox” trading cards are a variation of artist trading cards that must include a stamped image as part of the art on the card.

Well I have to say that I know only one artist that makes and exchanges the ATC’s. In fact that artist has a whole fist full of them and lets the person she is trading them to pick out the one they want.

Well I have already been outside to check on #18 drip art and I am happy to report that it is coming along just fine. When I have some more sunshine, I will take a picture and put I tin this blog. When it will be done and in the other gallery in Corona, California I will have a piece of “drip art” in two locations.

Well plugging in your car just got a boost. A $497,357 grant has been awarded to the EDA by the California Energy Commission to install 45 charging stations with 87 ports at workplaces, destinations and travel corridors over a three-year period. The Riverside County EDA, one of 39 applicants, had the highest score of all Southern California applicants to land the grant.

Charging stations will be installed at 30 workplace sites, all offering public access to the units. Seven EV chargers will be placed at the Riverside County Fairgrounds, Edward Dean Museum, Crestmore Manor, Riverside Law Library, two animal shelters and Lake Tamarisk Public Library in Desert Center.

Three “fast-chargers” are also part of the mix, allowing cars to charge in less than 30 minutes at locations in Riverside, Temecula and Indio. A survey of 1,400 drivers in areas where electric-charging stations were located also found that 500 people expressed a willingness to buy an electric vehicle if they had access to workplace stations,

Well that is about all of the stuff I have to report today.

 

 

Posted by Puck Friday, July 11, 2014 6:54:00 AM

Importing water 

Well hello, glad you came by for a spell. That coffee pot over there is just fresh made coffee so help yourself to a cup. Take the chair over by the window, people say it’s comfortable. I see you are up early today also. Yes here in the circle city of Corona, California it’s going to be double 8’s from 60 degrees right now.

Well with number 17 finished and waiting to be entered in the next show there at the Corona Art Association show Saturday, the work on # 18 is already off to a good start. Well at least I have the wood support done and already have one white coat of paint.

But I decided that the “drip paintings” needed to also have the drips on the side of the piece also. So now I am looking into also having the drips on the side so you can actually see the drips on the sides just like you see them on the front only smaller.

So my picture for today would only be this big piece of wood painted white. Not very interesting to, say the least. But #18 is however going to have some basic color put down first. I have chosen a diagonal red stripe to give it color under the drips. Who knows how it will look, but in my mind I think it will be okay. The stripe has to be large enough to show up, but not overpower.

Well you can’t say the people that were in Riverside County, California over the 4th of July did not have a good time. In fact 159 of them were arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence during the four-day July 4 holiday period. The enforcement period, which included two checkpoints and 13 saturation patrols, ran from Thursday, July 3, to Sunday, July 6. Not all of the 30 county agencies had reported their arrests as of July 8. The next major DUI campaign will take place over 18 days, concluding with Labor Day weekend. I always wondered why I liked to stay put on a holiday.

Next week, the state’s water agency is expected to adopt mandatory restrictions on lawn irrigation and other water use and back the rules up with fines of up to $500 per violation. The state is experiencing the most severe drought conditions in decades, and our  Gov. Jerry Brown’s call for voluntary water conservation has had disappointing results, officials said Wednesday. The new restrictions, if approved, would take effect Aug. 1 and remain in place for nine months.

The regulations target outdoor water, which accounts for 30 percent to 80 percent of residential water consumption, according to Marcus. People would be prohibited from watering landscaping to the point where there is runoff, washing a car with a hose that doesn’t have a shut-off nozzle, or running a fountain that doesn’t recirculate water.

So now I suppose the cities are going to have to find a “water cop” to see if everyone is in compliance. Guess the golf courses that have taken the dessert and turned them into lush green patches of landscape won’t be in the worry stages.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Puck Thursday, July 10, 2014 7:16:00 AM

Missed meeting 

Well it was made official; Riverside, California is another city to turn off its red light cameras. While I was having fun at the Corona Art Association meeting, the city council in Riverside, California was axing the cameras after 8 years. What is going to take the place of the $500.00 tickets that was paid to the city? Come on $500.00 for just running a traffic light when you already had the yellow and traffic was stopped waiting for you.

Well of course it does not become that easy. You have to give the camera people 2 months notice. Also what is the retired officer that has been reviewing the pictures going to do? Well maybe Don will become an artist or something.

Until recently, the program ran in the red, and it was in danger of being canceled in 2012 because of a projected $611,000 deficit. But officials reduced the number of cameras to cut costs and the city came out about $450,000 ahead in each of the past two years, according to city information.

Don’t know about others, but I avoid cities that have the red light cameras. I’m sure there is an app that tells you where they are and how to drive around them. Now all of you tech types, I was the one who thought of it first. Of course that assumes one is not already in place.

Well I have to tell you that Travis Farnes did a good job of explaining why an artist should have a web page. Which was a good thing because he is in the business. Yes he made it sound so simple; he had all of the 11 members there wanting one of his cards after the talk. He mentioned how links to some social media like Facebook can help also. Then he got to explain the difference between e-mail and a blog. I think that was where he lost some of them. Many of the members really don’t like to e-mail.

He did like wordpress, but said you would have a little learning curve. Most did not know of wordpress and asked why you would want to have that on your web page. Then they talked about domain names and how you only want popular ones like .com and .net.

Just one hour was all it took and then they took a break for some Doritos and a bread tray with dip. Oh yea they did have some watermelon slices there also. The bad thing is we were out of wine and had to settle for a bottle of champagne. Yes because I opened the bottle, I got to keep the cork.

So with such fun activities happening in Corona, It makes you wonder what the other 50 or so members were doing? I suppose they are waiting for the next meeting when Carol Chaney will be talking about “Creative Greeting Cards.” I know when I send a greeting card, I want it to be creative. Not the stuff you find at the 99 cent store.

Well that’s it for today. Need to work on my next Pollock inspired work.

Posted by Puck Wednesday, July 9, 2014 9:27:00 AM

Brown is the color 

The color brown

Well hello today we are going to explore the color brown. Yes that stuff you stand on when you leave the green grass. It is a composite color made by combining Red, yellow and some black. The color is seen widely in nature, in wood, soil, and human hair, eye color and pigment of the skin to name a few places an artist would use the color. It is also, according to public opinion surveys, the least favorite color of the public.

The color of the poor it was. In the Middle Ages brown robes were worn by monks of the Franciscan order, as a sign of their humility and poverty. Each social class was expected to wear a color suitable to their station; and grey and brown were the colors of the poor.

Artists began using far greater use of browns when oil painting arrived in the late fifteenth century. During the Renaissance, artists generally used four different browns; raw umber, the dark brown clay mined from the earth around Umbria, in Italy; raw sienna, a reddish-brown earth mined near Siena, in Tuscany; burnt umber, the Umbrian clay heated until it turned a darker shade, and burnt sienna, heated until it turned a dark reddish brown.

Looking into Wikipedia we see in the 1920s, brown became the uniform color of the Nazi Party in Germany. The Nazi paramilitary organization the Sturmabteilung (SA) wore brown uniforms and were known as the brownshirts. The color brown was used to represent the Nazi vote on maps of electoral districts in Germany. If someone voted for the Nazis, they were said to be "voting brown". The national headquarters of the Nazi party, in Munich, was called the brown house. The Nazi seizure of power in 1933 was called the Brown Revolution. At Adolf Hitler's Obersaizberg home, the Berghof  he slept in a "bed which was usually covered by a brown quilt embroidered with a huge swastika. The swastika also appeared on Hitler's brown satin pajamas, embroidered in black against a red background on the pocket. He had a matching brown silk robe.

Brown had originally been chosen as a Party color largely for convenience; large numbers of war-surplus brown uniforms from Germany's former colonial forces in Africa were cheaply available in the 1920s. It also suited the working-class and military images that the Party wished to convey. Through the 1930s, the Party's brown uniforms were mass-produced by the German clothing firm owned by Hugo Boss (1885-1948). Boss became a member of the Nazi Party in 1931, and was licensed supplier for the SA, the SS, and the Hitler Youth. After World War II he was stripped of his right to vote and his presidency of the company, but the company continued in business and still carries his name.

In the late 20th century, brown became a common symbol in western culture for simple, inexpensive, natural and healthy. Bag lunches were carried in plain brown paper bags; packages were wrapped in plain brown paper. Brown bread and brown sugar were viewed as more natural and healthy than white bread and white sugar.

The Chestnut tree has also been used since ancient times as a source brown dye. The bark of the tree, the leaves and the husk of the nuts have all been used to make dye. The leaves were used to make a beige or yellowish brown dye, and in the Ottoman Empire the yellow-brown from chestnut leaves was combined with indigo blue to make shades of green.

 

 

Posted by Puck Tuesday, July 8, 2014 3:01:00 PM Categories: Art

Time for tuesday 

Well I am sure by now you all know of the recovery of the stolen Matisse painting called “Odalisque in Red Pants.” But don’t look for it in the United States, because it’s going to be in the Caracas museum. It was recovered in 2012 by F.B.I. agents in Miami when they arrested two people and charged them with trying to sell the long-missing artwork. When it was recovered, American officials said the painting was worth $3 million.

Just in case you tourist happen to be going to Old Town Temecula, be rest assured that the sewer system is getting an upgrade. Yes the Eastern Municipal Water District has announced that they are going to upgrade the current system. The money to pay for the $13-million project will be covered by future development in the area, which will spare existing businesses and residents a big spike in their bills. Now myself I am going to miss the smell at the corner of Fifth Street and Old Town Front streets.

But wait they are not going to start the project till October, so you do have plenty of time to come by and get the wonderful aroma when you are shopping in Old Town Temecula, California.

Well the big event in Corona, California has to be the Corona Art Association meeting tonight. Yes about 25 of the 60 or so members will show up to learn how to build a website around 6:00 p.m. Yes Travis Farnes from “Motion Direct” will be there. After all you know how important it is for people to see your art. Now I suppose you are asking yourself if that valuable information is worth getting out of an air-conditioned building for pot luck.

Some of the members go all out when it comes to the food they bring. Yes cookies, Carmel covered pop corn, almond cookies will be among the taste tempting delights. Oh yes we will also have some strong decaffeinated coffee, caned soda’s and a white or red wine.

Just a few more drips and the first drip painting will be done. Because of the way it is made, it does take some time to actually dry completely. But it will be in the new show there at the Corona Art Association called “Oldies but Goodies.” It will be on this Saturday from 11:00 to 6:00.

Oh the Riverside museum of art is having a fund raiser.

A Fundraiser for the Riverside Art Museum

Sunday, August 10, 2014, 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

The Riverside Art Museum invites the community to celebrate seven artists who will face off at the museum to each create an assemblage piece of sculpture. A panel of three judges will choose who will be winner and who will receive the “brush off.”

During the event, a select group of the region’s leading artists will each get a box full of unknown cast-off “junk.” After opening the box, they each get two and a half hours to create their masterpieces. Competing artists include Jim Berhman, Ariana Cervantes, Cosme Cordova of Division 9 Gallery, Mario Loya, Laura Ryan, Gary Rainsbarger, and Martin Sanchez of Tio’s Tacos. Each artist can bring a preapproved home toolkit. The artists all have diverse backgrounds and differing styles from figuration to abstraction to installation and even jewelry. They use various mediums from paper mache to metals to “trash.”

Artist Laura Ryan is participating in the Brush Off as a way to encourage others to make art. “If one person sees hardware store items, throwaways, and junk turned into a unique piece of art....who knows? We might set a future Picasso on fire.”

The panel of judges includes businessman and art collector Jerry Ruiz, curator Carolyn Schutten, and artist Douglas McCulloh. They will evaluate the work for creative use of materials, overall aesthetic, and other aspects. There will also be an audience choice award.

The event will be MC-ed by artist and RAM Trustee Greg Adamson. It will feature art-making activities for guests, a hosted bar, and hors d’oeuvres.

“This is a great way for the Riverside Art Museum to share the talents of artists in our region while raising much needed funds,” says Patsy Herrera-Loya, RAM Trustee and committee chairperson. “Come and enjoy a glass of wine with us and watch the magic of artistic creation unfold before your eyes!”

Tickets are $50 and $75 and are available for purchase below or by calling 951.684.7111. Artist sponsorships include keeping the final piece of art created and are available for $500.  All proceeds from the event benefit the Riverside Art Museum. 

 

That’s it for today, need to get back to making some art

Posted by Puck Tuesday, July 8, 2014 8:49:00 AM

Super sunday in the sun 

So hello to everyone out there in internet land. We are in the circle city of Corona, California this morning and are getting ready for temperatures in the 95 degree range. Can you get too much BBQ food in one week? Well the smell of BBQing is in the air these last few days.

Now I like the idea of just using a number to label you work of art. Jackson Pollock did it and why not do it also? But then the problem of finding just the right number for the work. Should it be a prime number or a composite number? I suppose all of the math guys know the answers way more quickly than I do. So not being the math person, I shall just pick a random number and stick with that. Can you still let the computer generate a random number? Of course Euclid's theorem is a fundamental statement in number theory that asserts that there are infinitely many prime numbers. I can’t make that many pictures.

So I know you were wondering if I had any students in the Mixed Media class yesterday. Well in fact I did have one and the whole family came. The Father who is in the medical field did a drawing right beside the child. I have to admit that for a first time drawing it was really good. He really got the shading part down fast.

Now over at the local newspaper, the hot news is the person who designed the famous circle city called Grand Blvd. I suppose the history stuff is just used for “fillers” when all else fails. Yes I would suppose a city that has 185,000 people does not have any news happening. Especially on a 3 day weekend when no one really wants to work.

“You're getting a second look from someone important -- maybe a potential employer, maybe a romantic prospect. Take care to look your best and make sure that you're paying attention.” That’s what is in my Horoscope for today. So we shall see what happens.

Okay I admit that I was listening to the radio the other day. Now I know many stations say they have so many minuets of commercial free music. But all of the commercials stacked together in one group, one right after the other maybe no one is listening to any of them. Some of them are so fast I have to write them down so I don’t get confused on which number to call or where to shop for something that I don’t really need. That reminds me I need to plug in my cell phone this week so I can stay in the loop. I know the charger is here somewhere.

Well off to finish my “drip painting” today. The show is next Saturday and it needs to be dry enough to hang.

 

Posted by Puck Sunday, July 6, 2014 7:29:00 AM Categories: Art

Roy Lichtenstein 

Roy Lichtenstein, October 27, 1923 – September 29, 1997 was a famous artist noted for his “pop art.” He became a leading figure in the movement along with others who have names like  Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Linquest to name a few.

Favoring the comic strip as his main inspiration, Lichtenstein produced hard-edged, precise compositions that documented while it parodied often in a tongue-in-cheek humorous manner. His work was heavily influenced by both popular advertising and the comic book style. He described pop art as "not 'American' painting but actually industrial paint

Whaam  And Drowning Girl are generally regarded as Lichtenstein's most famous works.  Lichtenstein's works based on enlarged panels from comic books engendered a widespread debate about their merits as art. Although Lichtenstein's comic-based work is now widely accepted, concerns are still expressed by critics who say Lichtenstein did not credit, pay any royalties to, or seek permission from the original artists or copyright holders.

In 1966, Lichtenstein moved on from his much-celebrated imagery of the early 1960s, and began his Modern Paintings series, including over 60 paintings and accompanying drawings. Using his characteristic Ben-Day dots and geometric shapes and lines, he rendered incongruous, challenging images out of familiar architectural structures, patterns borrowed from Art Déco and other subtly evocative, often sequential, motifs.

Also in 1970, Lichtenstein purchased a former carriage house in Southampton, Long Island, built a studio on the property, and spent the rest of the 1970s in relative seclusion.

Among many other works of art lost in the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, a painting from Lichtenstein’s The Entablature Series was destroyed in the subsequent fire.

In October 2012 his painting "Electric Cord" (1962) was returned to Leo Castelli's widow Barbara Bertozzi Castelli, after having been missing for 42 years. Castelli had sent the painting to an art restorer for cleaning in January 1970, and never got it back.

Posted by Puck Saturday, July 5, 2014 4:21:00 PM

The Jackson Pollock look 

Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956), known as Jackson Pollock, was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for his unique style of “drip paintings.”

During his lifetime, Pollock enjoyed considerable fame and notoriety, a major artist of his generation. Regarded as reclusive, he had a volatile personality, and struggled with alcoholism for most of his life. He married to another artist Lee Krasner, in 1945 which became a major influence in his art. Pollock died at the age of 44 in an alcohol-related, single-car accident; he was driving. In December 1956.

Pollock signed a gallery contract with Peggy Guggenheim in July 1943. He received the commission to create Mural (1943), which measures roughly 8 feet tall by 20 feet long for the entry to her new townhouse. At the suggestion of her friend and advisor Marcel Duchamp, Pollock painted the work on canvas, rather than the wall, so that it would be portable. After seeing the big mural, the art critic Clement Greenberg wrote: "I took one look at it and I thought, 'Now that's great art,' and I knew Jackson was the greatest painter this country had produced."

Pollock was introduced to the use of liquid paint in 1936 at an experimental workshop in New York City by the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros. He later used paint pouring as one of several techniques on canvases of the early 1940s, such as Male and Female and Composition with Pouring I. After his move to Springs, he began painting with his canvases laid out on the studio floor, and he developed what was later called his "drip" technique.

He started using synthetic resin-based paints called alkyd enamels, which, at that time, was a novel medium. Pollock described this use of household paints, instead of artist’s paints, as "a natural growth out of a need" He used hardened brushes, sticks, and even basting syringes as paint applicators. Pollock's technique of pouring and dripping paint is thought to be one of the origins of the term “action painting.” With this technique, Pollock was able to achieve a more immediate means of creating art, the paint now literally flowing from his chosen tool onto the canvas. By defying the convention of painting on an upright surface, he added a new dimension by being able to view and apply paint to his canvases from all directions.

Continuing to evade the viewer's search for figurative elements in his paintings, Pollock abandoned titles and started numbering his works. He said about this: "...look passively and try to receive what the painting has to offer and not bring a subject matter or preconceived idea of what they are to be looking for". Pollock's wife, Lee Krasner, said Pollock "used to give his pictures conventional titles... but now he simply numbers them. Numbers are neutral. They make people look at a picture for what it is—pure painting." Jackson Pollock: Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?” That was the question on the front cover of Life magazine on August 8, 1949.

 

Thanks to internet sourses for some of the information.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Puck Saturday, July 5, 2014 2:56:00 PM
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Sensarium is devoted to creating interactive electronic art galleries around the world to promote more viewing of musical, digital and digitized art forms from artists of all genres.